Governing Board

Governing Board

Casa Grande Union High School District #82 Governing Board


Governing Board Members (L to R): Jack Henness, Joe Lopez, Taylor Kerby, Kelly Herrington, and Chuck Wright.




 President
Jack Henness
[email protected] 
Jack Henness was a CGUHSD Board Member from 1999-2010. In 2020, he was selected by Pinal County School Superintendent Jill Broussard from a pool of four (4) applicants to fill the seat vacated by Mr. Salcido. He was selected CGUHSD Board President in January 2021.


 
Member
Kelly Herrington
 
Kelly Herrington has lived in Arizona for over 20 years and in the Casa Grande area for the past five (5) years. She earned a marketing degree at the University of Arizona. She has two (2) children who are in the Casa Grande school districts and their educational welfare as well as all the other children in the area is of utmost importance to her. Kelly is very involved in our community and wants its continued growth and success. She is a local realtor and sales manager for her brokerage in Casa Grande. She also sits on the Executive Board for WeSERV (West and Southeast Valley) Association of Realtors and was the Pinal Chapter Chairperson for 2020. Charity and giving back to our community are also very important to her. Kelly has been the Co-Chair for the Realtor Memorial Run for the past four (4) years benefiting the Casa Grande Alliance Cancer Support Center and has also been involved in the Realtor Golf Tournament benefiting the Boys and Girls Club. Kelly loves her community and the opportunity to serve for its continued growth and success.    



 
Member
Taylor Kerby
Taylor Kerby is a full-time educator. After graduating from Arizona State University (ASU), Taylor completed dual master’s degrees in Education and Religion at Claremont Graduate University. He is currently a doctoral student at Grand Canyon University where he will graduate in 2022. He has served as a mentor teacher and is passionate about enabling educators to improve their pedagogy and connect with students. He lives in Casa Grande with his two daughters.  


 Pro Temp
Joe Lopez
[email protected] 
Joe Lopez, originally from California, has been an Arizona resident for 18 years. He is a certified ASE Master Technician and has worked in the automotive repair industry for 43 years as a technician, service manager, successful business owner, and as an instructor. He owned and operated an auto repair shop in San Jose, California, for twenty years, and his business in Casa Grande has been in operation since 2013. He has great dedication to the field of automotive technology, as well as to education and community service. Joe is a member of the Kiwanis Club of Casa Grande and was president of the club for the 2017-2018 term; he was a Kiwanis Club of Willow Glen member (San Jose, CA) for 19 years and was a two-time past president in that club. Joe taught automotive technology at both Central Arizona College and at Casa Grande Union High School. He and his wife, Rachel, have been married for 20 years. Joe enjoys desert landscaping, serving in the community, and helping people. He considers himself to be a life-long learner.  


 Member
Chuck Wright
[email protected] 
Chuck Wright is a Casa Grande native, growing up in a farming family in the Greene Reservoir area south of Arizona City. He has three sons, all of whom have graduated from CGUHS. Chuck is an industrial designer, specializing in architectural design and has been self-employed in his own business, Pinal Design Group LLC, in Casa Grande for 34 years. Chuck has previously served on this board in 1997-2001, serving two years as president. He is past Chairman of the Greater Casa Grande Chamber of Commerce and chairman of the Arizona City Sanitary District. Chuck also currently serves on the City of Casa Grande’s Board of Adjustments.  


Governing Board Statement: July 26, 2022

Board Statement Following Legal Review of Employee Disclosure

Click Here (English)

BOARD STATEMENT FOLLOWING LEGAL REVIEW OF EMPLOYEE DISCLOSURE

A District employee recently sent a letter to the Board alleging that some teachers who taught courses in the District’s credit-recovery program were required to change student grades from an F to a passing grade or face possible discipline or retaliation. The letter also alleged that the grade changes were improper and possibly illegal. Additional concerns were shared with media and in public that the grade changes may have been done to raise the District’s graduation rate in order to qualify the Superintendent for additional performance based pay.

Given the serious issues raised and the Board’s commitment to integrity, transparency, and educational excellence an outside investigation was conducted. The investigation included over 25 interviews of teachers, department chairs, counselors and district administrators, review of hundreds of documents and legal analysis of the accusations. The investigation revealed that the letter was based almost entirely on second-hand information. It also showed that any teacher who changed their student's grade used their professional judgment and applied legitimate grading criteria in doing so. The eleven grades that were changed did not impact the District’s graduation rate and did not have the purpose or effect of impacting the Superintendent’s performance pay.  

During the spring of 2022, site level and District level administrators developed an optional grading alternative that allowed a teacher of record to change a student’s grade who met stated criteria from an F to a P. The grading alternative was an organic idea collectively generated by that group at their weekly meetings. Pursuing the idea was a consensus decision of the group not a directive from the Superintendent. The alternative grading format had the potential of benefitting 28 seniors. Ultimately, 11 of them had an archived F changed to a passing grade by their teacher. Those grade changes were consistent with course requirements and related state standards.  

Teachers used their professional judgment when deciding whether to apply the optional grading alternative. Teachers were also given other options to work with seniors who were not on track to graduate. For example, some teachers reopened Edgenuity classes to allow students to complete work and receive a letter grade. Some teachers and department chairs chose not to implement the new grading option. No teacher or department chair was disciplined or reported any retaliation for exercising their professional judgment to change or not change a grade. 

Site administrators at Vista Grande High School and Casa Grande Union High School took different approaches to announcing the new grading option. There was no evidence of any effort by any District administrator to force this option on teachers.  

Finally, there was no evidence that the Superintendent pursued the grade change option to boost her performance pay or that the option had that effect. The District’s graduation rate is not a goal set out in the performance pay plan between the District and the Superintendent and the Board has complete discretion as to what impact, if any, an increased graduation rate would have on its decision whether to award performance pay and, if so, the amount awarded.  Additionally, the optional grading format had a negligible effect on the graduation rate. 

We share this information to clarify what is factual and to dispel inaccuracies. We hope for improved communications with parents, students, staff, and community. We are committed to helping our students obtain the quality education they will need to succeed as they choose their path in life.

Jack Henness
Board President

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DECLARACIÓN DE LA JUNTA DESPUÉS DE LA REVISIÓN LEGAL DE LA DIVULGACIÓN DE LOS EMPLEADOS

Un empleado del Distrito envió recientemente una carta a la Junta alegando que algunos maestros que impartían cursos en el programa de recuperación de crédito del Distrito debían cambiar las calificaciones de los estudiantes de una calificación F a una calificación aprobatoria o enfrentar una posible disciplina o represalias.  La carta también alegaba que los cambios de calificación eran inapropiados y posiblemente ilegales.  Se compartieron preocupaciones adicionales con los medios de comunicación y en público de que los cambios de grado pueden haberse realizado para aumentar la tasa de graduación del Distrito con el fin de calificar al Superintendente para un pago adicional basado en el desempeño.

Dados los graves problemas planteados y el compromiso de la Junta con la integridad, la transparencia y la excelencia educativa, se llevó a cabo una investigación externa.  La investigación incluyó más de 25 entrevistas a maestros, jefes de departamento, consejeros y administradores de distrito, revisión de cientos de documentos y análisis legal de las acusaciones.  La investigación reveló que la carta se basaba casi en su totalidad en información de segunda mano. También mostró que cualquier maestro que cambiara la calificación de su estudiante utilizó su juicio profesional y aplicó criterios de calificación legítimos al hacerlo.  Los once grados que se cambiaron no afectaron la tasa de graduación del Distrito y no tuvieron el propósito o el efecto de afectar el pago por desempeño del Superintendente.  

Durante la primavera de 2022, los administradores a nivel de sitio y a nivel de distrito desarrollaron una alternativa de calificación opcional que permitió a un maestro de registro cambiar la calificación de un estudiante que cumplía con los criterios establecidos de una F a una P.  La alternativa de calificación fue una idea orgánica generada colectivamente por ese grupo en sus reuniones semanales.  Perseguir la idea fue una decisión consensuada del grupo, no una directiva del Superintendente. El formato de calificación alternativo tenía el potencial de beneficiar a 28 personas mayores. En última instancia, 11 de ellos tenían una F archivada cambiada a una calificación aprobatoria por su maestro.  Esos cambios de grado fueron consistentes con los requisitos del curso y los estándares estatales relacionados.

Los maestros utilizaron su juicio profesional al decidir si aplicar la alternativa de calificación opcional.   A los maestros también se les dieron otras opciones para trabajar con personas mayores que no estaban en camino de graduarse.  Por ejemplo, algunos maestros reabrieron las clases de Edgenuity para permitir que los estudiantes completen el trabajo y reciban una calificación de letra.  Algunos maestros y jefes de departamento optaron por no implementar la nueva opción de calificación.  Ningún maestro o jefe de departamento fue disciplinado o reportó represalias por ejercer su juicio profesional para cambiar o no cambiar una calificación.

Los administradores del sitio en Vista Grande High School y Casa Grande Union High School tomaron diferentes enfoques para anunciar la nueva opción de calificación.  No hubo evidencia de ningún esfuerzo por parte de ningún administrador del Distrito para forzar esta opción a los maestros. 

Finalmente, no hubo evidencia de que la Superintendente buscara la opción de cambio de grado para aumentar su salario por desempeño o que la opción tuviera ese efecto.  La tasa de graduación del Distrito no es una meta establecida en el plan de pago por desempeño entre el Distrito y el Superintendente y la Junta tiene total discreción en cuanto al impacto, si lo hay, que una mayor tasa de graduación tendría en su decisión de otorgar el pago por desempeño y, de ser así, la cantidad otorgada.  Además, el formato de calificación opcional tuvo un efecto insignificante en la tasa de graduación. 

Compartimos esta información para aclarar lo que es fáctico y para disipar inexactitudes. Esperamos mejorar las comunicaciones con los padres, los estudiantes, el personal y la comunidad. Estamos comprometidos a ayudar a nuestros estudiantes a obtener la educación de calidad que necesitarán para tener éxito a medida que eligen su camino en la vida.

Jack Henness
Presidente de la Junta Directiva

CGUHSD #82 Superintendent

Dr. Anna Battle
Battle, Dr. Anna
Superintendent
Office: 520-316-3360 x 1101
Mary Rosenbam
Rosenbam, Mary
Executive Assistant
Office: 520-316-3360 x 1102

Meetings

Regular Governing Board Meetings are typically held the 1st Tuesday of each month at 6:30 p.m. (unless there is a conflict and approved by the Governing Board) at the District Office in the CGUHSD Board Room (1st Floor) and LIVE via our YouTube Channel

BEDH Public Participation @ Board Meetings

CGUHSD Board Meeting 12/06/2022

CGUHSD Board Meeting 11/18/2022

CGUHSD Board Meeting 11/01/2022

CGUHSD Board Meeting 09/27/2022

CGUHSD Board Meeting 09/06/2022

CGUHSD Board Meeting 08/09/2022

CGUHSD Board Meeting 07/19/2022

CGUHSD Board Meeting 07/12/2022

Our Non-Discrimination Commitment

Casa Grande Union High School District #82 prohibits discrimination in employment and educational programs based on race, color, religion, sex, age, disability, national origin, military status, genetic test information, sexual orientation or gender identity or expression and provides equal access to the Boy Scouts and other designated youth groups.

Questions, complaints, or requests for additional information regarding these laws may be forwarded to the designated compliance coordinator(s), Sean Casey, District Title IX Coordinator, 1362 N. Casa Grande Ave, Casa Grande, AZ 85122, (520) 316-3360 ext. 1111, or [email protected]

El Distrito Casa Grande Union High #82 prohibe la discriminación de empleo y programas educacionales basados en raza, color, religion, sexo, edad, descapacidad, origen nacional, estado militar, información de prueba genetica, orientación sexual o identidad de género, o expresion y provee acceso a los Boy Scouts y otros grupos juveniles designados.

Preguntas, quejas, o solicitudes para información adicional de acuerdo a estas leyes deben ser dirigidas a la coordinadora designada, Sean Casey, District Title IX Coordinator, 1362 N. Casa Grande Ave, Casa Grande, AZ 85122, (520) 316-3360 ext. 1111, o [email protected]

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